Published by admin on 09 Aug 2013

ROADFOOD FRIDAYS: RUMFISH GRILLE, BRIDGEVILLE, PA

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Am I on a beach somewhere, or am I in Bridgeville, PA just down the road from our office?  Thankfully, the answer is both!

Sunday, August 4th marked the 25th year of service at MSN for Cathy Vietmeier, and we celebrated on Monday with lunch at the new Rumfish Grille.  Part of a trend of nice restaurants in suburban strip centers, the Grille features fresh seafood and a nice variety of sides in an atmosphere that surpasses the great for a suburban town.  All of us enjoyed our food that ranged from a dinner with a shark steak that looked fantastic to a surf and turf sandwich that featured a nice cut of beef with shrimp and a horseradish mayo.  Lots of nice veggie sides like fresh grilled corn complement the meals.  The homemade mac and cheese was good and worth another trip as a side on my next visit.  The Sunday brunch was extolled by someone at lunch who had visited and enjoyed the experience.

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 As great as the food is, the atmosphere is even better.  Waterfalls, lots of outside seating in what they call Rumfish Beach, a very large patio featuring an outside bar, sand dancing area, and a stage which features music they describe as for “all ages”.  Several of us were very enthusiastic about coming back for beach music on a weekend night.  What is beach music?  A good discussion developed as to the merits of Jimmy Buffet, the Beach Boys, Bob Marley, and Dick Dale.  To this we can say, it’s all good, just like the Rumfish.  Our company has been in this town for over 30 years. We have eaten at about every restaurant that’s been here, and never has there been this much excitement about a place to eat or chill out.  It’s 5:00 somewhere!

 

This Roadfood Blog is written by Lin Cook, CEO.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours

 

Published by admin on 02 Aug 2013

ROADFOOD FRIDAYS: THE MURAL ROOM, MORAN, WY

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This lovely little restaurant is not your typical Roadfood find but is well worth the short detour off Route 191 between Jackson Hole and Yellowstone in order to enjoy a meal with arguably one of the world’s most spectacular views as backdrop. The Grand Teton Range is conveniently placed just outside the massive windows.  We enjoyed the Lobster Bisque, Mural Room Salad, and Prime Rib but a visit to the Mural Room is not about the menu, it is all about the view.  The Mural Room is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner from the middle of May until the beginning of October. If you plan to visit, be sure to make a reservation which you can do online. You will be competing for seats with all of the folks who are staying at the Lodge.  While there, check out the Carl Roters murals inside the restaurant, but be sure to take a walk outside for an unobstructed view of the range and some moose watching.

http://www.gtlc.com/dining/jackson-lake-lodge-the-mural-room.aspx

This Roadfood Blog is written by Anne Cook, Accounting.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

Published by admin on 11 Jul 2013

ROADFOOD FRIDAYS: THE BUNNERY, JACKSON HOLE,WY

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When it was time for breakfast in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, the locals recommended The Bunnery without any hesitation. We were thrilled because not only did they have the necessary extremely large cinnamon buns, but they also served a lovely glass of fresh squeezed grapefruit juice. Their breakfast menu goes far beyond the usual fare with some very fun offerings including The Gros Ventre Slide named after a famous local natural disaster. We particularly enjoyed The Glory Bowl which was very satisfying: swiss cheese melted under the broiler over two fried eggs, mushrooms and hash browns, garnished with sour cream & sprouts. It was accompanied by their wonderful O.S.M. bread (oats, sunflower, millet). So if you find yourself in Jackson Hole at breakfast time (which can be any time as they offer eggs all day!) don’t miss out on The Bunnery.

This Roadfood Blog is written by Anne Cook, Accounting.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

 

Published by admin on 28 Jun 2013

ROADFOOD FRIDAYS: THE BROOKLYN, SEATTLE,WA

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Ah, the great Pacific Northwest.  The fresh air, the majestic landscape, and the beautiful, bright sunny weather.  Oh wait, well… at least the first two are true, but the last one must be a wish in my mind left over from my trip to Seattle, Washington this May.  Fun Fact: Seattle happens to be the only major city in the continental United States that has more overcast days and rainy weather than my hometown of Pittsburgh.  We were in Seattle for the ACCE conference, sponsored by ICMI.  I must say that overcast days aside, I was quite smitten with the area, and the food was fantastic!  My fellow travelers and I ate at quite a few great restaurants, but one stood head and shoulders above the rest: The Brooklyn, located at 1212 Second Ave, just a hop, skip and a step away from Pike Place Market and the Seattle Art Museum.  We were at the tail-end of our trip, and it just happened to be my boss’s birthday, so I was glad the hotels concierge pointed us in the direction of this particular restaurant.

The Brooklyn’s moniker is ‘Seafood, Steak, Oyster House’, and their selection of all of these is impressive to say the least.  The most outstanding of these three was the oysters, because the Brooklyn offers eleven (yes, you read that right) types of oysters from the Pacific Northwest region.  These include (but are not limited to) Shoal Bay, Kummamoto (an import from Japan that is grown in the bay), Judd Cove, Pickering Pass, Shigoku and Quilcene, just to name a few.  Not being in the mood for oysters that evening, Sue and I decided to try the other two house specialties: seafood and steak.  As I often do when on the road, I decided to start off with a caesar salad, as I am very fond of them, and also like to see how the chef prepares them.  I’d say he/she did an excellent job, as the recipe included fresh anchovies.  The greens were crisp and fresh, and the dressing had just the right intensity and did not overwhelm the pallet.  A 9 out of 10, which only two other caeser’s have achieved.  For the main course, my boss decided to have the scallops, prepared with a vanilla bean-scented carrot puree and mascarpone-filled mission figs.  She thought them to be quite good.  As for me, the prime sirloin was one of the best steaks I have ever had, served with roquefort cheese, port wine jus and garlic confit.  The potato Delmonico side was unique and complimented the bold savory flavor of the steak exceptionally well.  Sue and I agreed that the portions were just right, and on that note the server asked us if we were interested in desert.  Being that it was her birthday, we both thought it a perfect way to end the evening, as they had a special raspberry/rhubarb cobbler.  It was quite fantastic; a great way to end the dinner!

To summarize, if I ever find myself in Seattle again, I will make it a point to have dinner at The Brooklyn.  Next time, we will sit at the ‘Chef’s Counter’ which overlooks the kitchen (quite comfy looking…)

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This Roadfood Blog is written by Matthew Davison, Technology Services Manager.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

 

Published by admin on 21 Jun 2013

ROAD FOOD FRIDAYS: COWBOY CAFE, DUBOIS,WYOMING

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If you find yourself in Dubois, Wyoming (where real cowboys work and play) you will need to stop at The Cowboy Café. Dubois is a true western town in the middle of nowhere. The Cowboy Cafe is right in the middle of town in a classic log building and is practically perfect in every way. Lunch is great with a wide selection of burgers and sandwiches and a number of different freshly baked pies. But we prefer a hearty breakfast part way through a long drive, long drives being a way of life in Wyoming. They have traditional breakfast selections but add to that buffalo and elk sausage. Their skillet breakfasts are wonderful with a foundation of cowboy potatoes and fried eggs topped with a variety of meats, vegetables and cheese. So, if you are on your way from Yellowstone to anywhere, do stop. It will be hours until you get anywhere else!

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This Roadfood Blog is written by Anne Cook, Accounting.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

Published by admin on 14 Jun 2013

ROAD FOOD FRIDAYS: MEAT & POTATOES, PITTSBURGH,PA

 

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Meat & Potatoes.  Sounds like a restaurant for men.  In reality, it is a trendy restaurant in Pittsburgh’s theater district where everyone can  feel at home, but maybe especially men?  It’s always hard to get a table, so reservations are recommended.

There is such a wide variety of well prepared comfort food available, it’s hard to know where to begin.  A good place to begin is always snacks and appetizers.  My wife’s favorite snack is the Fried Brussels (yes, brussel sprouts).  Not for everyone, but she says they are very good.  I prefer the fried pickles.  They also have fried chicken livers, which I like and are hard to find, not for those on a diet like much of the menu.  And, last but not least, poutine, a manly dish of fried, gravy, and local cheese curd, a dish imported from Quebec.  Junk food for French speakers in Pittsburgh!  Poutine was big hit with my son, son in law, and friend when we ate there earlier this year.  And there is a Kobe corn dog!  High end junk food!  M & P’s appetizers are a bit pricey, most well over $10, but they include such exotic treats as bone marrow and a duck liver pate.

For the main meal, the sandwiches are very good and reasonable.  I have had the Three Little Pigs, which is highly recommended, featuring pork, ham, and bacon (three pigs), Swiss cheese, and an egg.  Again, not recommended for the light eater.  The pub burger is from the same vein with pork belly pastrami, a horseradish cheddar, an egg, and special sauce.  The main courses include a pork dish, salmon, a nice chicken with avocado and salsa, pot roast, and more.  All the dishes are standard meat based fare, but with interesting twists to them, and are mostly around $20.  They have salads for the lighter veggie seekers, but they aren’t the focus of the menu.  Awesome brunch food is available like a nice chicken and cheddar jalapeno waffles with bourbon maple syrup, and a nice Huevos Ranchero  they have drinks for those so inclined, including absinthe, not for the faint of heart, and lots of other speakeasy prohibition themed drinks and much more.  Drinks looked on the pricey side.

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Meat & Potatoes is always packed, close to the action in downtown Pittsburgh, and has something interesting and unique for everyone.  Definitely worth a visit, especially for brunch, and remember you are going to need a reservation.

 

This Roadfood Blog is written by Lin Cook, CEO.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

Published by admin on 07 Jun 2013

ROAD FOOD FRIDAYS: JACK’S BAR-B-QUE, NASHVILLE,TN

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Jack’s is an old school barbeque spot in downtown Nashville in the music area.  It is not a touristy spot like the nearby Jimmy Buffet Margaritaville, or the Hard Rock, or even the local Wild Horse, but a real down home spot.  The original Jack’s, in fact, lost it’s lease in a building torn down to make a parking lot for the Hard Rock.

Like many successful restaurants, Jack’s has started to expand to other locations, just opening its second.  But it still retains the local charm and home spun flavors that make it a success.  Unlike most restaurants that cater to a certain demographic, Jack’s is one of those spots where truck drivers, tourists, couples, and music execs all pleasantly coexist.

Jack’s serve six different types of meat, and that’s what BBQ is all about!  I always get the combo, and try three different groupings each time I go.  I like the turkey as you don’t see that a lot of places, and they also have TN pork shoulder, TX beef brisket, smoked chicken, sausage, and St. Louis ribs.  You can’t go wrong with any of them.  They also have veggie plates for the non-carnivores.  But why go to Jack’s for that?  Would I go to Jack’s for veggies?  When pigs fly!  You get two sides with every meal, so you can try some of the veggies.  The Mac and cheese is great, and yes I know that is not a vegetable.  They have excellent corn as well.  For dessert, try the local favorite, chess pie.

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So try Jack’s.  It’s very homey and local, and the food is a meal for the day.  It’s great stuff.  You might see me there, or maybe Little Jimmy Dickens, maybe even Tim McGraw and Faith Hill.  Who knows?

 

This Roadfood Blog is written by Lin Cook, CEO.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

 

Published by admin on 10 May 2013

ROADFOOD FRIDAYS: VERSAILLES RESTAURANT, MIAMI,FL

         

I am from Pittsburgh originally but spent 5 years in Miami during and after graduate school. Even though I have moved back to Pittsburgh, Miami will always be my second home. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nBbGtccrAY

There are many great places to eat in Miami and I miss all of the opportunities for outdoor eating, oh yes and also the weather! One of my favorite traditional Miami dining experiences is Versailles Restaurant, “The World’s Most Famous Cuban Restaurant”. http://www.versaillesrestaurant.com/

Dining at Versailles transports you both to another time and another place. All the traditional Cuban dishes there are excellent, but my favorite is the bakery. For a meal I recommend the assorted Croquettes to start and for the entrée the classic Cuban sandwich, oxtail stew, or the classic Cuban sampler. Wash it down with a Cuban Mojito!

When I go there I often just bypass the restaurant and make a meal of desserts! Here are some of my absolute favorites:

- Guayaba y Queso

-Capuchinos y Panetelas

-Palmeritas

To fully enjoy the pastries you must have them with a Café Con Leche or Café Cubano. See for yourself! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2LRRj0Dhfs

Miami is full of life and Versailles Restaurant is no different. Although it is a destination there are many regulars who frequent Versailles and it has been a place for networking and community. A Miami institution, with a rich 40 year history will satisfy more than your stomach. http://www.versaillesrestaurant.com/press/landmark-miami-restaurant-celebrates-40th-anniversary

 

Blog is written by Reba Schenk, Sales and Marketing Director

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours

Published by admin on 19 Apr 2013

ROADFOOD FRIDAYS: PLAZA AZTECA, WYOMISSING, PA

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In our recent hunt for a good Mexican restaurant, we came upon the Plaza near our hotel as we visited the Berks Jazz Festival last weekend.  A small chain, primarily in the northeast, it has some good points.  The staff was friendly and efficient.  The bar had the southwest tile overtop of it, which gave the restaurant kind of a cool look.  Our waiter brought the option of a tableside fresh avocado dip, which my wife loves.  Both the dip and the server were very good.  The food was pretty average, but the overall experience was good.  My wife ordered fajitas, which she enjoyed, and the presentation and taste was fresh.  I ordered a combo platter with a burrito and enchilada, and it had that microwaved similar taste for each dish, like a high end Taco Bell.  Not a bad choice for lunch if you are in the greater Reading area.  Here is the website:  http://www.plazaazteca.com/home.  If you have a favorite Mexican restaurant, especially on the east coast, drop a comment with your choice.

The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

Published by admin on 14 Dec 2012

ROAD FOOD FRIDAYS: SAY CHEESE, WEST READING, PA

My wife and I recently spent the weekend in Reading, PA attending the Peter White Christmas concert with Mindi Abair and Rick Braun, and spending some time with friends.  One of our stops was for Sunday brunch at Say CheeseSay Cheese is in the trendy shopping area of West Reading, and is a perfect spot for a light lunch or Sunday brunch.  My wife and each had soup and a sandwich.  The grilled cheese was well made and made a perfect combo with the excellent soup.  We tried the chicken and white bean, along with the baked tomato with shaved asiago.  Awesome!

Say Cheese also has a small store that features salsas, jams, crackers, and, of course, cheese!  A very nice selection for holiday gift baskets, and we bought quite a few items to make a few gift baskets for friends.  A highly recommended stop!

 
The term “roadfood” is trademarked by Jane and Michael Stern of www.roadfood.com, and is used by permission.  They are the founders of the roadfood movement.  Check out their books on Amazon, and head out on one of their food tours!

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